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Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

2 edition of Subfurface Organic Layer Associated with Permafrost in the Western Arctic. found in the catalog.

Subfurface Organic Layer Associated with Permafrost in the Western Arctic.

Canada. Dept. of Mines and Technical Surveys. Geographical Branch.

Subfurface Organic Layer Associated with Permafrost in the Western Arctic.

by Canada. Dept. of Mines and Technical Surveys. Geographical Branch.

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  • 38 Currently reading

Published by s.n in S.l .
Written in English


Edition Notes

1

SeriesCanada Geographical Branch Paper -- 18
ContributionsMackay, J. Ross.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21907394M

Permafrost is ground that continuously remains frozen for two or more years, located on land or under the ocean. Permafrost does not have to be the first layer that is on the ground. It can be an inch to over miles deep into the Earth's surface. Some of the most common permafrost locations are located in the Northern Hemisphere. Almost a quarter of the Northern Hemisphere is .   Many changes in the Arctic are ominous, and some of the most troubling are occurring beneath the surface, in the permafrost. Permafrost is a layer of frozen soil that covers 25 percent of the Northern Hemisphere. It acts like a giant freezer, keeping microbes, carbon, poisonous mercury, and soil locked in place. Now it’s melting.

Scientists estimate that five times as much carbon might be stored in frozen Arctic soils—permafrost—as has been emitted by all human activities since This worries people who study global warming. While emissions from permafrost currently account for less than 1 percent of global methane emissions, some researchers think this could change in dramatic . The thermal conductivity of the surface organic layer at average moisture contents is about one-third that of the silt and thus functions as a layer of insulation for the permafrost. Before spring melt or after a period of low precipitation, the organic mat is desiccated and will absorb cm of water before downslope runoff occurs.

  Arctic watersheds store approximately 50% of global soil organic carbon of which much is held in shallow continuous and discontinuous permafrost soils addition, these watersheds hold a. Fast response of cold ice-rich permafrost in northeast Siberia to a warming climate: Nature Communications, 11(Article ), illus., 64 ref., The ice- and organic-rich permafrost of the northeast Siberian Arctic lowlands (NESAL) has been projected to remain stable beyond , even under pessimistic climate warming scenarios.


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Subfurface Organic Layer Associated with Permafrost in the Western Arctic by Canada. Dept. of Mines and Technical Surveys. Geographical Branch. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Subsurface organic layer associated with permafrost in the western Arctic. Ottawa: Geographical Branch, Dept. of Mines Technical Surveys, [] (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: J R MacKay; Canada.

Geographical Branch. ASSOCIATED WITH THE PERMAFROST SURFACE IN THE WESTERN ARCTIC OF CANADA J, Ross Mackay A discontinuous subsurface organic layer, ranging in thickness from less than an inch to several feet, lies closeto the permafrost surface throughout exten sive areas ofthe Western Arctic of Canada* Althou^the organic layers are found.

Accommodate changes associated with permafrost. organic layer than in areas of discontinuous permafrost with a thick organic layer. Therefore, the proposition that 'the warmer the climate, the.

Permafrost is tightly coupled to the organic soil layer, an interaction that mediates permafrost degradation in response to regional warming. We analyzed changes in permafrost occurrence and organic layer thickness (OLT) using more than soil pedons across a mean annual temperature (MAT) by: permafrost in the area was not considered to have had any influence on the associated well-drained mineral soils.

Organic soils with permafrost probably occupy 80 per cent of the area between the Liard River valley and northern Alberta. In the area from Camsell Bend to Arctic. Arctic and Alpine Permafrost • Definition: Permafrost is a layer of permanently frozen ground, that is, a layer in which the temperature has been continuously below 0oC for at least two years.

• This means that moisture in the form of either water or ice may or may not be present. • Permafrost may therefore be unfrozen, partially. Permafrost loss on the Kenai Peninsula is likely associated with a warming climate, wildfires that remove the protective forest and organic layer cover, groundwater flow at depth, and lateral heat.

Alessio Gusmeroli, Lin Liu, Kevin Schaefer, Tingjun Zhang, Timothy Schaefer and Guido Grosse, Active Layer Stratigraphy and Organic Layer Thickness at a Thermokarst Site in Arctic Alaska Identified Using Ground Penetrating Radar, Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research, /AAAR00C, 47, 2, (), ().

The ice- and organic-rich permafrost of the northeast Siberian Arctic lowlands (NESAL) has been projected to remain stable beyondeven under pessimistic climate warming scenarios. However. Many changes in the Arctic are ominous, and some of the most troubling are occurring beneath the surface, in the permafrost.

Permafrost is a layer of frozen soil that covers 25 percent of the. Above the permafrost, the active layer freezes and thaws seasonally, and below the active layer is the transient layer, which thaws only at the decadal to centennial scale (Shur et al., ).

Most subsea permafrost is not subject to the seasonal variation seen on land, since its upper temperature is controlled by bottom seawater temperatures. In areas underlain by ice-rich permafrost, the deepening of the active-layer can cause surface subsidence, which in turn can affect surface micro-relief5, infrastructure7, and ecology3.

Deepening of the active layer can release nutrients sequestered in permafrost, and may affect biogeochemical cycling. Permafrost is ground (soil or rock and included ice and organic material) that remains at or below 0 °C for at least two consecutive years.

Permafrost terrain consists of an “active layer” at the surface that freezes and thaws each year, underlain by perennially frozen ground. The top of permafrost is at the base of this active layer.

On permafrost slopes, a shallow thaw front and the presence of thick organic mats create ideal conditions for high-velocity flow at and just below the interface of the organic and mineral layers (Carey and Woo ).

Our hydrographic comparison of a seeping water track with that of a rill shows that the behavior of both channels were similar. Scientists from the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology and Lomonosov Moscow State University in collaboration with researchers from Florida State University undertook the first ever study.

Spatial and temporal variability in active layer thickness over the Russian Arctic drainage basin Tingjun Zhang,1 Oliver W.

Frauenfeld,1 Mark C. Serreze,1 Andrew Etringer,1 Christoph Oelke,2 James McCreight,1 Roger G. Barry,1 David Gilichinsky,3 Daqing Yang,4 Hengchun Ye,5 Feng Ling,6 and Svetlana Chudinova3 Received 30 November ; revised 7 May ; accepted.

A subsurface organic layer associated with permafrost in the western Arctic. Canada Dept. Mines and Technical Surveys, Geog. Geog. Paper 21 p Mackay, J.R. The valley of the lower Anderson River, N.W.T.

Geographical Bulletin Mackay, J.R. [1] Even though the arctic zone of continuous permafrost has relatively cold mean annual air temperatures, we found an abrupt, large increase in the extent of permafrost degradation in northern Alaska sinceassociated with record warm temperatures during – Our field studies revealed that the recent degradation has mainly occurred to.

Field measurements of electrical freezing potentials in permafrost areas. J.R. Mackay. Geology of the engigstciak archaeological site, Yukon Territory A subsurface organic layer associated with permafrost in the western arctic: Selected Co-authors Countries and Regions of Publication (1).

Given the unique processes associated with eroding permafrost, the strategies to protect shorelines in the Arctic have a poor engineering and scientific underpinning.

Eroding coastal sediments contribute substantial sediment to the nearshore which contains organic carbon and other constituents such as heavy metals. Arctic soils are associated with permafrost and their properties result dominantly from the action of cryogenic processes.

These processes are driven by the presence and mobility of unfrozen soil water as it migrates along the thermal gradient towards the frozen front in the frozen system, feeding the ice bodies in the soil.Climate-induced Arctic warming has led to increased soil temperatures, causing a succession of changes associated with permafrost degradation and widespread ground collapse or thermokarst, including deepening of the seasonally thawed surface active layer1,2 and alterations to watershed hydrology3, changes threaten to destabilize ancient (Pleistocene-aged) .in substantial permafrost disturbance, primarily in the West watershed where the active layer reached depths in excess of m compared to – cm in prior years (detailed in Lamoureux and Lafreni`ere ).

Subsurface melt of mas-sive .